About The Census Project

The Census Project is a broad-based coalition of national, state, and local organizations that support an inclusive and accurate 2020 Census and American Community Survey (ACS) (the modern version of the census “long form”). Its member organizations, representing the private, public, non-profit, and academic sectors, rely on objective data that the Census Bureau produces to inform evidence-based investment, policy and planning decisions.

Mission

Lead the Fight for Data Quality

The Census Project encourages Congress and the Administration to fund all phases of the next decennial census and the ongoing ACS to ensure that timely, accurate, and reliable socio-economic and demographic data are collected and disseminated broadly to support informed decision-making in the public, private, non-profit, and academic sectors.

Listen to Communities

The Census Project also supports maintaining the ACS as a mandatory survey, to preserve the availability of reliable, irreplaceable data for all communities, including rural areas, neighborhoods, American Indian reservations and Alaska Native villages, and small populations groups (such as people with disabilities, veterans, and national origin subgroups). The U.S. House of Representatives has voted several times, through amendments to the Census Bureau’s annual appropriations bill, to make response to the ACS voluntary, and once to eliminate the ACS entirely. Census Project stakeholders were instrumental in convincing Congress, ultimately, to drop these ill-advised proposals. Each student has access to the best possible learning technologies, as well having guest classes from industry professionals. We believe this better prepares your child for their careers or own businesses.

 
 

Our Activities

The Census Project’s activities include letters to Congress and the Administration; congressional briefings; fact sheets; press briefings; testimony at congressional hearings; blogs and articles; and regular updates to our national network of stakeholders. We keep stakeholders, the public, and the media informed about key policy and operational developments related to the 2020 Census and ACS, including important research, testing, and development milestones.

The Census Project will continue to support public and media education campaigns that highlight the importance of investing in 2020 Census planning and operations and maintaining a robust ACS.

Census Project Co-Directors

Mary Jo Hoeksema, director of government affairs for the Population Association of America and Association of Population Centers, and co-director of The Census Project

Since January 2004, Mary Jo Hoeksema has been the Director of Government Affairs for the Population Association of America and Association of Population Centers.  In addition to representing PAA and APC, Ms. Hoeksema has co-directed The Census Project since 2008.  Prior to her position with PAA/APC, Ms. Hoeksema worked at the National Institutes of Health for approximately 10 years, as the Legislative Officer at the National Institute on Aging and as the Special Assistant to the Director of the NIH Office of Policy of Extramural Research Administration.  Ms. Hoeksema served as a Legislative Assistant for Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro and Legislative Correspondent for U.S. Senator Jeff Bingaman.  Ms. Hoeksema has a Master of Public Administration from the George Washington University and is a former Presidential Management Fellow.

Howard FienbergVP Advocacy for the Insights Association, and co-director of The Census Project

Howard is the Insights Association’s lobbyist for the marketing research and data analytics industry, focusing primarily on consumer privacy and data security, the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), tort reform, and the funding and integrity of the decennial Census and the American Community Survey (ACS). He has also been co-director of the Census Project since early 2018.

Before the Insights Association, he worked in Congress as senior legislative staffer for then-Representatives Christopher Cox (CA-48) and Cliff Stearns (FL-06). He also worked more than four years with a science policy think tank, working to improve the understanding of scientific and social research and methodology among journalists and policymakers. Howard formerly served on the Board of Directors for the National Institute for Lobbying and Ethics and is a past member of the Board of Directors for the Association of Government Relations Professionals. He has an MA International Relations from the University of Essex in England and a BA Political Studies from Trent University in Canada, and has obtained the Certified Association Executive (CAE), Professional Lobbying Certificate (PLC) and the Public Policy Certificate (PPC).

Howard’s father was a statistics professor and decades-long advisor to (and critic of) the Census Bureau, giving him deep Census roots.

The Census Project Advisory Committee

Ex-Officio Members
Mr. John Thompson, U.S. Census Bureau Director, 2013-2017
Dr. Robert Groves, U.S. Census Bureau Director, 2009-2012
Dr. Steve Murdock, U.S. Census Bureau Director, 2008-2009
Dr. Ken Prewitt, U.S. Census Bureau Director, 1998-2001
Dr. Marty Farnsworth Riche, U.S. Census Bureau Director, 1994-1998
Mr. Vince Barabba, U.S. Census Bureau Director, 1973-76 and 1979-81
Ms. Katherine Wallman, U.S. Chief Statistician, 1992-2017

Advisory Committee Members
Paul Emrath, National Association of Home Builders
Joseph Fortson, Nielsen
John Foti, Service Employees International Union
John Connolly, International Council of Shopping Centers
Terri Ann Lowenthal, Consultant
Angela Manso, formerly of NALEO
Terry Ao Minnis, Asian Americans Advancing Justice
Joan Naymark, Minnesotans for the American Community Survey
Bill O’Hare, O’Hare Data and Demographic Services
Denice Ross, Georgetown Beeck Center
Arthur Scott, National Association of Counties
Corrine Yu, Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights

Help us ensure a complete and accurate count

The Census Project connects hundreds of organizations and individuals advocating for a decennial Census to count everyone where they live and the American Community Survey (ACS) to continuously understand our fast-changing neighborhoods.

Remember every dollar counts!