About

About the Census Project

The Census Project is a collaboration of business and industry associations; civil rights advocates; state and local governments; social service agencies; researchers and scientific societies; planners; foundations; and nonprofits focused on housing, child and family welfare, education, transportation, and other vital services.

About the Census Project Blog

The Census Project Blog offers commentary on current 2020 Census and ACS policy and operational issues. The blog was active from September 2009 to September 2010 to chronicle the 2010 Census and restarted in September 2011. The views expressed in each blog post are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Census Project coalition members, collectively or individually.

About the Authors

Mary Jo Hoeksema, director of government affairs for the Population Association of America and Association of Population Centers, and co-director of The Census Project

Since January 2004, Mary Jo Hoeksema has been the Director of Government Affairs for the Population Association of America and Association of Population Centers.  In addition to representing PAA and APC, Ms. Hoeksema has co-directed The Census Project since 2008.  Prior to her position with PAA/APC, Ms. Hoeksema worked at the National Institutes of Health for approximately 10 years, as the Legislative Officer at the National Institute on Aging and as the Special Assistant to the Director of the NIH Office of Policy of Extramural Research Administration.  Ms. Hoeksema served as a Legislative Assistant for Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro and Legislative Correspondent for U.S. Senator Jeff Bingaman.  Ms. Hoeksema has a Master of Public Administration from the George Washington University and is a former Presidential Management Fellow.

Howard Fienberg, VP Advocacy for the Insights Association, and co-director of The Census Project

Howard is the Insights Association’s lobbyist for the marketing research and data analytics industry, focusing primarily on consumer privacy and data security, the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), tort reform, and the funding and integrity of the decennial Census and the American Community Survey (ACS). He has also been co-director of the Census Project since early 2018.

Before the Insights Association, he worked in Congress as senior legislative staffer for then-Representatives Christopher Cox (CA-48) and Cliff Stearns (FL-06). He also worked more than four years with a science policy think tank, working to improve the understanding of scientific and social research and methodology among journalists and policymakers. Howard serves on the Board of Directors for the National Institute for Lobbying and Ethics and is a past member of the Board of Directors for the Association of Government Relations Professionals. He has an MA International Relations from the University of Essex in England and a BA Political Studies from Trent University in Canada, and has obtained the Certified Association Executive (CAE), Professional Lobbying Certificate (PLC) and the Public Policy Certificate (PPC).

Howard’s father was a statistics professor and decades-long advisor to (and critic of) the Census Bureau, giving him deep Census roots.

 

7 thoughts on “About

  1. The Census Project should write a brief for the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in support of the citizenship question being added onto the 2020 Census. A federal judge in New York has ruled against the Trump administration’s decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. The district court ruling in New York is expected to be appealed to the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and, ultimately, to the Supreme Court. If the Census Project “is a broad-based network of national, state, and local organizations that supports a fair and accurate 2020 Census and comprehensive American Community Survey (ACS — the modern version of the census “long form”),” the Census Project should support the citizenship question being added onto the 2020 Census.

    The Census Project should write a brief that African Americans are the biggest winners from the citizenship question being added onto the 2020 Census. The citizenship question should help African Americans, not harm African Americans. African Americans would love to live in the State of Illinois, for example, because of the Civil War outcome and the passage of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the United States Constitution. The State of Illinois should be doing business with African Americans before noncitizens.

    The Census Project should review U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman’s opinion. U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman’s opinion acknowledge the issue of standing starting on page 102 of his opinion. The Census Project’s brief for the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals should challenge noncitizens’ standing. In regard to standing, noncitizens should not have standing to prevent the citizenship question from being added to the 2020 Census. Noncitizens should have diminished representation as a result of the citizenship question being added to the 2020 Census. Citizens should have more representation than noncitizens. By removing the citizenship questions, noncitizens arguably have equal representation to citizens and it is not fair to citizens. There are American citizens if they had their way who would prefer noncitizens have more representation in the United States than African Americans.

    If the Census Project wrote a brief in support of the citizenship question being added onto the 2020 Census and explained how African Americans are the biggest winners from the citizenship question being added onto the 2020 Census, the likelihood that the citizenship question would be added onto the 2020 Census should increase. The Census Project should focus on the State of Illinois benefitting from the citizenship question being added to the 2020 Census because the noncitizens would be replaced by African Americans. African Americans can help the State of Illinois with addressing the State of Illinois’s decline in population. African Americans would be foolish to not value the State of Illinois when the State of Illinois has a lot to do with why African Americans are citizens today.

  2. The Census Project should work with the United States Census Bureau so the 2020 Census accounts for educational attainment in the United States. When accounting for educational attainment in the United States, the 2020 Census should account for Juris Doctorates along racial lines as a category. The 2020 Census should account for unofficial transcripts from a law school’s Student Records Administrator when accounting for Juris Doctorates along racial lines because it is possible that academic institutions create falsified transcripts. The 2020 Census can help out African Americans and academic institutions in the United States when trying to address the low number of African Americans who go to law school and graduate from law school in the United States.

  3. The Census Project should work with the United States Census Bureau so the 2020 Census accounts for migration and school enrollment in the United States. When accounting for migration and school enrollment in the United States, the 2020 Census should account for college degrees and juris doctorates along racial lines. When accounting for migration and school enrollment in the United States, the 2020 Census should account for Place of birth (domestic).

    The 2020 Census can help out African Americans and academic institutions in the United States when trying to increase the number of African Americans who graduate from college and law school in the United States. The 2020 Census can help out African Americans and academic institutions in the United States when trying to conclude how many African Americans go to college or law school in the state an African American was born in. The 2020 Census might demonstrate that African Americans typically do not go to college and law school in the state an African American was born in.

  4. The Census Project should work with the United States Census Bureau so the 2020 Census includes more questions than the United States Census 2010 Form. If the United States Census 2020 Form cannot include the questions below, the United States Census 2030 Form should include them.

    I was comparing the United States Census 2010 Form with the United States Census 2000 Long Form (The United States Census 2000 Long Form asks the question “Is this person a citizen of the United States?). I read the Congressional Research Service Report “The 2010 Decennial Census: Background and Issues.” I noted in the Congressional Research Service Report “The 2010 Decennial Census: Background and Issues” in the Summary section that “For 2010, the Bureau devised a short-form questionnaire that asked for the age, sex, race, and ethnicity (Hispanic or non-Hispanic) of each household resident, his or her relationship to the person filling out the form, and whether the housing unit was rented or owned by a member of the household. The census long form, which for decades collected detailed socioeconomic and housing data from a sample of the population, was replaced by the American Community Survey, an ongoing survey of about 250,000 households per month that gathers largely the same data as its predecessor.” I read “Questions Planned for the 2020 Census and American Community Survey.”

    The United States Census 2020 Form should include questions such as:

    “What is the highest degree or level of school this person has completed?”

    “Did this person live in a different state other than the state this person lives in as of April 1, 2020?” Please list up to 5 cities and states starting on January 1, 2000 going forward.

    “Did this person work before?” Please list up to 5 employers since January 1, 2000 going forward. Please list title at each employer.

    “Do you want to work for an employer?”

    “Have you applied for work with an employer?” Please list up to 10 employers since 2015.

    “How does this person prefer to travel?”
    • Car, truck, or van
    • Bus or trolley bus
    • Streetcar or trolley car
    • Subway or elevated
    • Railroad
    • Ferryboat
    • Taxicab
    • Motorcycle
    • Bicycle
    • Walked
    • Worked at home
    • Other method

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